Modern Dadhood

Father Figure, On Camera And Off | Sesame Street’s Emilio Delgado on Being a Role Model and Dad

Episode Summary

Imagine, if you will, you’re a young Latino man in your late twenties living in Los Angeles. You’ve just had your first child and you’re pounding the pavement, working your ass off to land any acting gig you can get. And then one day the telephone rings, and the opportunity of a lifetime presents itself… three thousand miles away. That’s the beginning of Emilio Delgado’s journey as both a father and an esteemed actor best known for portraying the beloved Luis Rodriguez on Sesame Street. Emilio joins us on Modern Dadhood to discuss being a father to his son, stepsons, and adopted daughter—and a role model and father figure to millions of kids across the world.

Episode Notes

Imagine, if you will, you’re a young Latino man in your late twenties living in Los Angeles. You’ve just had your first child and you’re pounding the pavement, working your ass off to land any acting gig you can get. And then one day the telephone rings, and the opportunity of a lifetime presents itself… three thousand miles away. That’s the beginning of Emilio Delgado’s journey as both a father and an esteemed actor best known for portraying the beloved Luis Rodriguez on Sesame Street. Emilio joins us on Modern Dadhood to discuss being a father to his son, stepsons, and adopted daughter—and a role model and father figure to millions of kids across the world.


The episode opens with a conversation about paternal influences on kids. Adam shares about how he was not only shaped by his own father’s personality, but by a family friend with a very different parenting style. The guys discuss the communal activity of gathering around the television as kids, and some of the actors who played trusting paternal characters on network television, serving as role models to young people.

Adam and Marc welcome actor Emilio Delgado into the conversation. Emilio is most well known for his role as Fix-It-Shop owner Luis Rodriguez, a Latino actor who joined the cast in 1971 and earned the impressive superlative of “longest running role played by a Mexican American actor in a television series.” The characters of Luis and his wife Maria portrayed the Mexican Americans realistic/accurate/real realistically, which was rare at the time on American television. Emilio’s character literally introduced the Latino culture to millions of American-born children, exposing many to their first Spanish words and providing a launch ramp for further exploration of the many cultures of the world.

Emilio shares fond memories of his time on the set of Sesame Street, the camaraderie with the cast and crew, and working with Jim Henson. Simultaneously, off camera, Emilio was raising his own children and step children, frequently traveling between Los Angeles and New York to keep up with a rigorous filming schedule. We discuss topics including:
 

•   Being a role model to young people
•   Becoming “part of the family” to viewers
•   The familial set culture on the show
•   Working with child actors
•   Recognizing the impact of Sesame Street
•   Learning what it means to be a father, a husband, and a man
•   Bringing his son Aram to the set of Sesame Street
•  Raising his daughter Lauren later in life
•  Being a mentor to newer cast members
•  The stress of being away from home for months at a time
•  Knowing Jim Henson


To close out the show, Marc describes in detail saving his naked toddlers from disaster in an installment of “Did I Just (Have To) Say That Out Loud?

[Episode Transcript]
 

LINKS:
Emilio Delgado on IMDB
Emilio Delgado on Wikipedia
Emilio’s Instagram
Baa Baa Bamba
Quixote Nuevo
Red Vault Audio
Caspar Babypants
Spencer Albee

Episode Transcription

Adam:

Hello, Marc.

Marc:

Adam, it's great to see you, my friend.

Adam:

Back at you. We're recording on a Friday night. Do you like recording in evenings better or in mornings better?

Marc:

Oh, man, I kind of like recording at night. It's nice. I come down here in my garage, kick back and it's kind of nice.

Adam:

Dad time.

Marc:

Yeah.

Adam:

This is Modern Dadhood. It's an ongoing conversation about the joys, challenges and general insanity of being a dad in this moment.

Marc:

You're right. And my name is Marc Checket and I am a dad of twin boy toddlers.

Adam:

And my name is Adam Flaherty and I'm a father of two daughters, six and three. We're not experts.

Marc:

You're not.

Adam:

But we do love to do love to hang out and talk dad stuff and share stories and gain new perspectives through conversations with our dad guests, including today's guest.

Marc:

Oh, I'm excited about this one. I'm excited about all of them but this one was, I don't know, pretty close to the heart really.

Adam:

It's a special one. The name Emilio Delgado may not actually immediately ring a bell for our listeners, but I know the name “Luis” will hit home for a lot of people.

Marc:

Luis who could be found… on Sesame Street. In the Fix-It Shop.

Adam:

That's right. You know, nostalgia is such a big part of our show and of our brand and this guy epitomizes nostalgia for a lot of us. And we'll catch up with Emilio shortly. Marc, you and I, I consider us extremely lucky that we both grew up with great dads in the picture, but even having present and involved parents, there's always room for other positive role models who shape our character and might even have shaped who we are as dads now.

Marc:

Oh yeah.

Adam:

For example, my dad is an incredible guy. He's tough as nails, he is so selfless. A lot of people look up to him as a role model. I feel like I'm like him in a lot of ways when it comes to how I am a dad to my girls. But I also spent a lot of time as a kid with one of my best friends, Ted, and his family who were neighbors a couple of houses down and his dad would take us on just tons of adventures. Camping, they had an amazing boat that we got to spend a lot of time on, just these day trips to cool places, arcades, outdoor stuff, restaurants, and Ted's dad was a huge personality and a very different person and a very different father than my dad, for better or worse.

Adam:

And I spent so much time with them that they were like a second family to me. And I certainly recognize ways that my personality was influenced by those experiences with Ted and his dad too. And then there were people like Mr. Rogers, for example, figures on television that we spent a lot of time with growing up. I wonder for you, were there any public figures like Mr. Rogers growing up, who sort of you looked up to as a father figure or just felt like you could trust?

Marc:

Well, first of all, there's Tim the Tool Man Taylor.

Adam:

Oh, hell yeah. “Uhhhhh?”

Marc:

God, that was perfect.

Adam:

I didn't even rehearse it.

Marc:

That was incredible. When I think way back to young childhood, like when I would have been watching, say Mr. Rogers Neighborhood or Sesame Street, I watched a lot of Nickelodeon as well. I can't really pick anybody out in particular from that time.

Adam:

How about LeVar Burton, did you watch Reading Rainbow growing up?

Marc:

I did watch Reading Rainbow, yeah. But I do definitely think of, when I think of a little bit later on in my life when I was maybe a young teen or preteen and I watched a lot of those Thursday night, Friday night shows. It was like family sitcoms and they all kind of had the dad character that had slightly different characteristics.

Adam:

You're going to say Patrick Duffy, aren't you?

Marc:

Patrick Duffy, man.

Adam:

Smiling eyes.

Marc:

A man's man, hard working man. I just, I loved shows like that. And I know that they weren't realistic and they all had the specific character, like Uncle Phil from From Fresh Prince, was kind of like that type of person for me I think. I don't know, it was just like no bullshit, super smart guy, you had to do things the right way. And I don't know, I guess maybe too because he was like a judge so it had some of that authority to him. I think I really did like Tim the Tool Man Taylor a lot probably because my dad was a woodworker as a hobby. In some way I just kind of identified with that because it was really in a lot of ways similar to my own dad.

Adam:

It's funny, I even think of James Taylor in that way, you know? He feels like your uncle, this accessible person that you've spent so much time with their musical catalog that you feel like you know them on a personal level and that there's no way that somebody like James Taylor could be any different than you would expect him to be.

Marc:

Yeah.

Adam:

And that's I think the trust thing that I'm talking about. And it's funny that you talk about your family gathering around to watch a show when it came on at a certain time, it makes me think of how TV used to be this communal activity. It was sort of the centerpiece of the living room and your family gathered together to watch something and how now media consumption just feels much more private and like an individual activity. And I think a lot of that is because you can watch it on your phone, you can watch it on a tablet, you can take those things anywhere you want and watch whatever you want. And I think that that can become really dangerous when you're a parent, depending on the level of investment and attention you have in what your kid is doing with those devices.

Marc:

Yeah. We use the TV, we try to be pretty strategic about television just in general. And I always feel a little bit like, ooh, I don't want to just leave them alone with that thing. But it's a totally different feeling if I'm sitting there with them, and I kind of enjoy it. And maybe, hearing you and just having this conversation, makes me kind of think maybe the reason why I like that is because that's often how I watched TV growing up. It's Thursday nights at 7:00 pm, let's sit down and watch that rock block of sitcoms and TGIF the next night, right? And I kind of like that, I kind of like sitting and watching Story Bots on Netflix, it's a favorite. And then we have something to talk about after we watch the show. So it becomes a much more interactive thing and brings the characters into reality so that we can actually have conversation and learn from them.

Adam:

Well, our guest today is someone that I spent so much time watching and learning from as a kid on Sesame street. And I think that he is someone that you could just watch as a kid and just trust.

Marc:

Yeah.

Adam:

And it's almost like the character of Luis was really a neighbor or a family friend. I think that the same goes for other characters on Sesame Street, Gordon, Bob, Susan, Maria, Gina, so many of them, but there's just something about Emilio Delgado. It's probably who he is as a person and what he brought to the character of Luis that just makes him feel like a friend, you know? And I'm sure he had the same effect on kids around the world. Emilio was so kind to join us recently from his home in New York city to chat about playing a role model for decades on Sesame Street and simultaneously being a dad and stepdad off-camera.

Marc:

And so without further ado here is our conversation with Emilio Delgado.

Adam:

Hi Emilio, how are you doing?

Emilio:

Hi, how are you? Good morning to all of you.

Marc:

Hello there.

Emilio:

All the dads out there and hello from everybody at Sesame Street.

Adam:

How is life in Manhattan right now?

Emilio:

It's real slow in Manhattan. Not the Manhattan that I knew when I first got here, let me tell you.

Adam:

Well, thank you so much for joining us on Modern Dadhood. Your portfolio of work in television and in music is very robust. You've done a lot, but for us, a big part of our show, Modern Dadhood, revolves around nostalgia. And for me personally, I grew up on Sesame Street, watching people like yourself, Bob McGrath and Maria played by Sonia Manzano, Gordon and Susan, and I would imagine that many of our listeners are probably in the same boat in terms of growing up watching you on television. So first off, I hope you weren't offended that much of our conversation is structured around your time on Sesame Street.

Emilio:

Not at all, not at all. I mean, it was a big part of my life.

Adam:

So there's much we could talk about, but obviously the subject matter of our show is fatherhood. And I'll start off by asking you, was there a time during your tenure on Sesame street where you began to recognize the extent to which you are a positive male role model and perhaps even a father figure to so many kids watching?

Emilio:

Yeah, well, that's an interesting question. Of course, when I first started out on the show, I was a young actor, I had a job and I was out there doing what I know how to do, acting and singing and doing comedy or whatever it was. So I was a very happy actor, individual, working in a international show. It wasn't until a few years later that I started to realize how important it was to a lot of people. And I think probably when it really hit me was later on, like maybe 20 years in, when I started out going out into the hinterland all over the United States doing live shows. And it was only then that I realized the full import of what we had been doing on Sesame Street and how we had been interpreted and received. I mean, because we were literally in everybody's living room for how long, right? So we really became part of families. And then there was some very nice stories, beautiful stories, or some very sad stories, latchkey kids who've grown up with this thing. So it was a lot of different stories that came at us. And that's when I think we began to realize the importance of what we had been doing on the show. And it was beyond just teaching the one, two, three, and the ABC, you know?

Adam:

Your wife Carole actually shared with me that, I know you in non-pandemic times, you do attend a lot of live events and that people will come up to you. And maybe these are some of the same latchkey kids who you have described or just children who didn't have those strong parental roles in their families, but people will come up to you and say, "Emilio, you were the best thing about my childhood." How does that feel?

Emilio:

Oh, it's amazing. I mean, like I said, there's a lot of sad stories out there and there's beautiful stories as well, but to just have people tell you their story about how it affected them, it's very satisfying, not only, not only as an actor, but as a human being, myself.

Marc:

Emilio, were there times on the set of Sesame Street where you felt that sort of paternal relationship to any of the younger actors that were on the show, or could you tell that maybe they felt that?

Emilio:

Yeah, well of course when I first started the show, we were the younger actors. It was not far back. But later on, of course there were other people that came on the show that were younger than we were, Muppeteers, who had grown up with the show as children themselves so they were very appreciative of the fact that there we were there, they were, working with people that had actually influenced them. So yeah, it was all very satisfying.

Marc:

I wonder if we can shift a little bit and talk about your children. Who are they, when were they born and what are they up to these days?

Emilio:

Yeah, well I'll start by saying that I grew up myself in an extended family, we all lived in the same houses on the Mexican side of the border. I was born in California, but we had family on both sides of the border of US and Baja, California. And in growing up, my father was absent. He was somewhere, but of course I grew up with my mother's family and uncles and aunts and cousins and grandfather and grandmother. And so that extended family was very important to me. It left out very, very important imprint on my life and how I grew up and how I think of family.And so I grew up in this extended family and as I grew up, I never had any kind of psychological detriment. I didn't ever felt anything like that in my life. When I grew up and became a man and then got married and had a family for the first time, I mean, it was an amazing thing. It was all of that experience of being a father and a husband was concurrent with beginning a career. So it was all part of the same thing, but it was an amazing thing to me. My first marriage was when my son Aram was born. As a father, I was stumbling around, I didn't know what to do. This is the new thing, but you live and learn. You live and learn and the basic thing of everything is that love really takes care of everything. Love, you just love. Of course he's like the original Sesame Streeter. I mean, he was the perfect age for Sesame street and he grew up watching me and watching Sesame. He was the number one fan that I had the whole time.

Marc:

Now Aram appeared on a couple of episodes of Sesame Street. Is that right?

Emilio:

This is, yeah, in his younger years when he was maybe, I don't know, five or six years old, I think he was on the show several times, very, very briefly, and I don't think he ever said any of the lines. But he was there and he was part of it. Although I think at the time he was a little on the shy side, but that was normal for kids. When you put them on the set and there's all these lights and all these gigantic creatures coming at you like Big Bird and Snuffleupagus. I mean, it can be intimidating. And all these Muppets popping up and doing all this stuff. But yeah, I tried to incorporate him into what I was doing so that he had a feeling of being a part of it. He's a 50 year old man, wow I can't believe that, my son Aram is 50 years old with a family of his own. And our grandson Eladio is going on six I think now. Time flies. So that was my first experience as a father and as a husband. And then later on, there was another marriage in which I inherited several stepchildren, two sons then. I can't really say that I brought them up because when I came into their life they were already beginning to be teenagers, so they were on their way to being their own human beings. But I think there were many aspects of my life that may have rubbed off on them. And then later, of course now with Carole, my present wife and I got married 30 years ago, along with my sweet wife Carole came her daughter, Lauren, who is my adopted daughter now. And she's 35 years old, my gosh. So I had the experience of really bringing up a child because when I first met Lauren, our daughter, she was four, four and a half years old and came into my life fully by the time she was five. So from five until the present day, I've been her dad. So that has been a beautiful experience of learning for me, how to be a husband and a father and a provider and a teacher and whatever.

Adam:

So Lauren would have come into your life around the time we were watching Sesame Street growing up and very heavily invested in the Muppets. How did suddenly having Luis from Sesame Street as her dad affect Lauren growing up through school?

Emilio:

Yeah. Well, I could imagine that when she was growing up, I mean, she didn't go around with a megaphone saying that she was my daughter I don't think, because I know she was trying to live her life growing up and dealing with all of the facets of childhood and school and friendship and all of that stuff. But I think in the long run and from what I know and what she tells me, she's always been very proud of me and being her father. And so yeah, she was very proud of that and I feel it from her.

Marc:

Can you recall any particular fatherhood challenges that arose from what I'm guessing was a very time-intensive career for you?

Emilio:

Yeah, of course being on the show required of me to be in New York, we were in studio for maybe four or five months out of the year. And we did enough material for 130 one-hour shows.

Marc:

Wow.

Emilio:

I mean, there was a lot of material to do way back then with the show was an hour. So we were in studio for many, many months. Initially, of course, I was from Los Angeles and with my first wife and my son, we had moved to New York and it was cultural shock for us because we were from the West and here was New York city, fast and furious, and we just couldn't adjust. So after two years we just went back to Los Angeles. Then I commuted for a few years back and forth, which was a strain on the family because either I had to be here by myself or we had to travel back and forth and then the schooling and all that for Aram. And the same thing with later with Lauren, our daughter. So, yeah, that was a little bit difficult being away from the family for months at a time. But Carole and I finally got it together and we just said, that's it, we're not going to do that anymore. We're going to be together. So that's when we, everywhere we moved, whether we moved to Los Angeles or we moved to New York, we were always together. So that fixed that for everybody.

Adam:

What was it like raising a son off camera at the same time that you were working with a group of children onset, creating content, designed for children on camera?

Emilio:

Yeah well for me, I mean my personal life was just part of the whole thing. I mean, I was living my life and incorporating that into whatever I was doing professionally. Everybody had that same mentality, that same feeling of family, and when we all came together socially, it was like this big extended family coming together.

Adam:

Yeah, I wonder if you could talk just a little bit more about that comradery among the cast and crew. I mean, I feel like I've heard you say the word family a few times. Would you use that word when you talk about the cast and crew?

Emilio:

Absolutely, yes. I mean, I think that we turned into an extended family. I mean, you can imagine after 50 years, not only on the show itself as the characters, but off the show becoming friends and getting to know and love each other and being around each other. And not only the actors on the show, but with a lot of the people that were involved in the production of it, Muppeteers and people in production. And it was this gigantic, beautiful family that we all knew that we were doing something that really meant something, that was really good for everyone.

Adam:

I have this image in my head of you and Bob and Roscoe walking onto set, and the new cast members jaws must just drop when they see you, you're all legendary.

Marc:

So I'm going to step back really quick to something that you mentioned earlier, you talked about being part of a big extended family, and that's how you grew up with a lot of I think you said aunts, uncles, grandparents around. Can you talk about what about that experience did you bring with you into the character of Luis?

Emilio:

Yes, well, I think that was ingrained in me being part of a family and being around people. And I do think that one of the important things about Luis and Maria being on the show, for the first time on American television, you saw a couple of Latinos being actual people on the show. They were just these people that were a part of the community. They had their own business, they had a family, it was like showing Latinos and Latinas as real human beings, which was a thing that was sort of absent in American media for many years. People would just come up to us and say, oh, you're the first ones that we've seen that actually look and sound like us. So that aspect of American life was never shown really until Luis and Maria came on the show. And I think that was an important aspect of Sesame Street, showing Latinos in a positive aspect.

Adam:

Of course, and I mean, where it was intended to represent this sort of inner city neighborhood, of course you need to show diversity. It just seems like such a no brainer and so I need to applaud them for introducing that when they did and then maintaining that for all of these decades.

Emilio:

It was an amazing thing when this came on and of course with the Latino aspect into it of introducing a different language. But people speak another language other than English? Oh my gosh, yes. What is that? Uno, dos, tres, wow. One, two, three, and kids were very proud of learning another language, it expanded their mind, it expanded their mind. Many of the people that were involved in the writing at that time weren't Spanish speakers or anything like that, but we, Sonia and I, incorporated Spanish into the script and kind of threw it in. So one day I'm in the Fix-It Shop and Big Bird walks in and out of nowhere, I just said "Pájaro!" Greeting him, right? We did this short bit. And then John Stone, the director and producer asked me afterward, he said, after we taped the first take on it, he said, "What does that mean, "pájaro" or whatever it was that you said?" I said oh, "pájaro," that means bird. He says, "Oh, [foreign language 00:24:55], okay. Use that." So from then on, every time I saw Bird Bird I'd say eh, [foreign language 00:25:03].

Adam:

Yeah.

Emilio:

And I think that's what Sesame Street was. And my estimation was that Sesame street, when they were watching that television screen, I always imagined it for those kids as a window into the whole world out there, it was their window into the world.

Marc:

I kind of feel like it would be a little bit of a missed opportunity, especially when talking about cast and crew and all of the other folks that were involved with the creation of Sesame Street, not to ask you about Jim Henson. Can you talk a little bit about what it was like working with Jim Henson and knowing him personally?

Emilio:

Oh, it was an amazing thing. I mean, every day that we were in the studio, we watched the master at work. He was absolutely an incredible human being, an incredible performer, extraordinary creative person in every respect. And of course his leaving us was a blow, that was extraordinary to each and every one of us. But even so after all these years of him being gone, it's as if he's never left, because he left such a trace of himself in everything that we do and everything that we show, because like I say, he's such an extraordinary, creative person. And I just think of him as a wizard. I mean, he's out there somewhere in some dimension, still creating beautiful things. And I always think of him that maybe the third dimension was not big enough for him. He's gone on to bigger and better things, but he left us his legacy of that creativity.

Adam:

Emilio Delgado, you are a father and an adoptive father, a stepfather, a grandfather, and a father figure to so many young people around the world. And on top of it all, you're a total class act. Thank you sincerely for inspiring us for all these years. And thanks for your time today for coming to chat about fatherhood with us on Modern Dadhood.

Marc:

Appreciate it so much, Emilio.

Emilio:

You bet. Marc and Adam, thank you very much.

Adam:

I do believe it's time for another installment of:

Marc:

Did I Just Say That Out Loud?

Adam:

You really are like Bill Curtis.

Marc:

I'm always ready for it. Whenever I need to be an over the top announcer, I'm just always ready for it. I do have a did I just say that out loud? And I wonder if this isn't more of a sub category actually. Is this a “did I just have to say that out loud?” So slight nuance there.

Adam:

Oh. Do you want to revise the title, the announce or anything?

Marc:

How about this. And now for the very first installment of Did I Just Have To Say That Out Loud?

Adam:

Also known as… Really?

Marc:

Yeah. Here's what I'm going to do. I'm going to say it, and I'm going to see if you can come even close to guessing the scenario. So here's what I said. I said it very, very quickly as I lunged towards my kids, okay? I said, "No, no, don't do that. It presents some problems we're not familiar with." It was the most together I've ever been in one of these moments.

Adam:

That's something that you would say to your employer or to like a college professor.

Marc:

Yeah.

Adam:

Or like a doctor.

Marc:

I became, this is maybe the only hint that I'll give you. As the words were coming out of my mouth, I was really conscious of what I was saying. I didn't want to make them uncomfortable, but I definitely wanted them to stop what they were doing.

Adam:

In a fraction of a second your brain adjusted from “oh, don't do that, you’re about to lop your penis off!” to...

Marc:

You're not that far off.

Adam:

Really?? To… “this is going to pose a problem we are not prepared to deal with.”

Marc:

Yeah, and that's really what I was saying was whatever's going to come out of this situation, I don't know if I have the tools necessary to deal with it, so let's just stop now. But you were in the right bodily vicinity.

Adam:

Oh, I think I got it. It has to do with the vacuum cleaner.

Marc:

Ooh.

Adam:

So you or Jamie were vacuuming the living room floor and one of the twins picked up the vacuum wanted to see what it was like to clean the floor and just happened to slide the pants down.

Marc:

Just happened to carefully remove his pants.

Adam:

And you didn't notice that until after you finished adding the half and half into your coffee and stirring it, and tapping the spoon on the rim and then you looked over and saw the pants down and out of your mouth came that statement.

Marc:

The sentence. You're close. But it didn't have anything to do with the vacuum.

Adam:

Okay. Let's have it.

Marc:

Okay. It was hot, let's just get that straight. We were outside playing. There was a little hose action over there, a little splashy table action over here, and a little sandbox action over here. And so I had two fairly wet children who we had disrobed completely because this is the country, this is New Hampshire, no one's around.

Adam:

Who's going to see? Brendan across the street?

Marc:

Who's going to see? So we had two free roaming, naked children running in the backyard. Jamie and I were just sitting there. We had each cracked a beer. We had our little $19 plastic Adirondack chairs that we were lounging in. And we were having a good time. We were just talking with each other because the boys were playing so nicely.

Adam:

It's rare and sounds very idyllic.

Marc:

It was so idyllic and is absolutely rare. I turn and I look and I see one of my kids has a shovel, a scoop from the sandbox filled with sand and he's sitting, and my other son is standing next to him, like sort of thrusting his hips forward. And the son with the scoop of sand was getting ready to pour it like right on the other one's penis. And they were working together to do this.

Adam:

Oh, teamwork.

Adam:

I can't even think about that kind of pain.

Marc:

That's what I'm saying, and so I sprung from my chair and lunged forward to kind of grab the shovel, sort of smack, grabbed the shovel and I yelled, "No, no, don't do that. That presents some problems we're not familiar with," because I didn't want to freak them out. So it was kind of this fine line of like, I don't want them to have some weird memory of their father attacking them and yelling at them while they're naked in the backyard. But I definitely, I didn't want a scoop of sand going onto one of my son's penis.

Adam:

Well-played.

Marc:

I felt pretty good after.

Adam:

Sometimes when you snap into that sort of emergency fight or flight thing, your brain works fast.

Marc:

I know how loud my kids can scream. I didn't need that in my life.

Adam:

I love it. I think that was a great one.

Marc:

Thanks man.

Adam:

Great Did I Jus Say That Out Loud, great interview… great episode.

Marc:

If we don't say so ourselves.

Adam:

Dads, you can find us at the all new, or at least semi new, moderndadhood.com or you can sign up for our mailing list while you're there to get new episode alerts and more. You can also find Modern Dadhood on iTunes slash Apple podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, Google podcasts, and more. Please consider giving us a quick rating and a review. That is a really wonderful way to support us

Marc:

You know what else you can do? You can drop us a note at, Hey, H-E-Y, @moderndadhood.com. We'd love that. Big thank you to Caspar Babypants and Spencer Albee for our music and to you, Pete Morse at Red Vault audio for pressing all the buttons, making us sound real good.

Adam:

Also big thanks to Joe at About Artists and to Emilio Delgado himself. And of course thank you to you for listening.

Marc:

Thank you.